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Bang the Bore X: Zone of Alienation, 6th August 2011 (featuring works based on Xenakis and Lucier)
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    FULL PRESS RELEASE CAN BE FOUND HERE: http://www.bangthebore.org/archives/1448

    Hi everyone. This is a request for as much assistance as you're willing to give us.

    We're planning something special for Bang the Bore X. The John Hansard Gallery in Southampton have given us our next year's worth of dates. Half as a gesture of goodwill and half because it seemed the most appropriate use of the space, we've agreed to theme this year's events around whatever exhibitions they have planned.

    The first will be themed around an exhibition of photographs taken inside the Chernobyl exclusion zone by Jane and Louise Wilson. And the Hansard Gallery have just this week given us a date of Saturday 3rd August to have it all ready (which ain't a lot of time).

    So we could do with your help, as much help as you're willing to give. We want to collect as much material as possible to use in the following areas:

    - Music: we want songs/music that specifically deals in themes of power, energy, nuclear energy. Songs about coal mining, songs about dams/hydro, songs about nuclear power. As many as possible.

    - Other audio: we've got a field trip planned to gather ambience/field recordings from a power station's cooling towers (but if you want to do something similar then the more the merrier). But we'd also like speech, interviews, news snippets, anything. Nuclear power is in the news a lot at the moment, so if you find anything on Radio 4 (or whatever stations you happen to listen to) please either record it and post a link here or post a link to it on iPlayer and we'll record it for use.

    - Visuals: we want to collate as many photos/video snippets as possible to run in loops on possibly up to three projectors simultaneously. If you come across evocative images, decent footage, documentaries then post or link to them here. Ideally we don't want to steam them from teh internets on the day (I've seen that go horribly wrong on too many occasions), so preferably something we can edit together ourselves (you're welcome to volunteer to help with the editing, too).

    - Text: we want tons of quotes on the subject of energy production, preferably focusing on nuclear but with the whole wider context too. Newspapers, commentary, scientific papers, philosophers. The caveat here is we'd prefer it to be informed opinion rather than scaremongering stuff. If you come across something (and you'll come across a lot, what with Fukushima and the Chernobyl anniversary this is in the news a lot) then bookmark it or cut and paste it into this topic.

    - Promotion: sadly this is a game of beat the clock. We've got less than a third of our usual time to pull together an event that could be as much as three times as much work as anything we've tried to stage before. So we could do with your help promoting this. For promotional purposes, what we know at the moment is that it will be at the John Hansard Gallery on the University of Southampton campus on the afternoon of Saturday 3rd August, and it will be free entry/donations on the door. If you can help us circulate that message as much as possible then there'll be more information as we get closer to the date.

    Finally, if anyone has reservations about the subject matter, we'd like to assure you that we do too. This is meaty, complex thematic material. When we were first discussing it we knew that we didn't want to do something that was naïvely pro or anti. We thought that the best way of approaching the subject would be to conflate the personal with the political and aim for a kind of sensory overload, to present our mixed feelings honestly and with as much integrity as possible. We're not aiming to be exhaustive or compendious, that would be impossible with a subject this enormous. We will omit an infinite amount more than we can include.

    We're focusing on nuclear because the exhibition focuses on nuclear, but you can't properly consider nuclear without extending the frame to other sources of energy, transport, environmental impact, science, climate change and the growing consumer demand that drives the whole industry.


    So yeah. Lots of very meaty stuff to consider. We'd love as much input as you have time to give.
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    We also have a few performance elements planned. This is what we've got so far:

    - A piece inspired by Iannis Xenakis' Concret PH. The original piece is a close mic'd recording of coal burning which is then treated electronically. We're substituting coal for oil shale and aiming to do as much of it live as possible.

    - A piece inspired by Alvin Lucier's Clocker. In a nutshell, the piece explores our viscerally subjective, physiological relationship to time by modulating a clock's ticking with delays that are controlled via galvanic skin response sensors. For our version we'll be replacing the clock with a geiger counter, thus replacing time with radiation in the conceptual framework of the piece.

    We've got a couple of other performances planned too, but we'd like to get those together in our heads before we post about them.
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Something to get the grey matter churning:

  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Another that has some relevant material...

  • grantgrant
    Posts: 7
    "Supercollider" close enough for you? Not about *energy* specifically, but definitely about manipulating atoms and radiation and quantum effects:



    or



    or (my favorite):

    http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/2008/09/23/song-we-can-blame-peter-higgs-at-the-collider/

    ----

    Maybe just play "Atomic" on an endless loop. Everywhere. Always:


  • grantgrant
    Posts: 7
    Did you follow my God of Concrete, God of Steel obsession a few years back? (There's an mp3 file there...)

    ----

    Reddit, just yesterday, had an "askscience" question about what really happens to the nuclear plants in the zombie apocalypse.

    -----

    Oh, and I forgot about this guy. Talk about obsession:

    http://www.dangerouslaboratories.org/radscout.html

    A boy scout became a lethal radiation addict, basically. It became a real problem when he built mini-reactors in his shed.
  • grantgrant
    Posts: 7
    I promise I'll stop now... but see if you can find an academic with access to this journal article (and accompanying media):

    Acoustic computer model for ultrasonic imaging of heavy liquid metal nuclear reactor
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    grant said: Did you follow my God of Concrete, God of Steel obsession a few years back? (There's an mp3 file there...)


    You were the bloke whose God of Concrete obsession inspired me! I remember the mp3, it was a guide track so people could hear the melody, right? Did you ever find a version with people singing it?

    I'm copying over your contributions from Facebook:


    I really don't want to overwhelm you - there's a novel/multimedia event waiting to happen with just Fukushima material. Like... love the graphic here: http://blogs.nature.com/news/2011/03/fukushima_crisis_anatomy_of_a.html

    And this story about the hero pensioners is simply awesome: http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/2011/06/07/skilled-veterans-corp/

    But there are also some great, imagination-inspiring stories that predate Fukushima.

    Radioactive boars are a problem: http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/2010/08/09/radioactive-boars-rising/

    So are Iran's nuclear molemen:
    http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/2010/01/13/nuclear-molemen/

    More mundanely, there's actually a bigger problem with nuclear waste from *coal* than nuclear power plants:
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=coal-ash-is-more-radioactive-than-nuclear-waste

    And stuff around the Large Hadron Collider is equally huge and sort of related (what happens if you're inside?):
    http://www.popsci.com/scitech/article/2008-07/say-im-inside-large-hadron-collider-and-its-revving-should-i-be-concerned

    -----

    MORE useful for your ends, there are some stunning images out there.

    Rapatronic nuclear test photo:
    http://guildofscientifictroubadours.com/2007/11/04/science-art-rapatronic-photo-nuclear-explosion-1952/
    (YOU MUST USE THAT IMAGE)

    If you want to get some perspective, the Van Allen Belt is a zone of radiation that protects Earth:
    http://bit.ly/meGgc9
    (as well as making the Fantastic Four happen).

    That's a good start, I guess. I really don't want to throw too many things at you at once.


    and...

    Also:



    (You know Firefox has a plug-in that'll download YouTube videos as FLV files, yes?)

    And you could probably run the whole installation from material from archive.org: http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=atomic+AND+mediatype:movies


  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Please don't worry about overwhelming us... we've got a team of five people to do the sifting and collating, so right now what we need is a landslide that we can process over the course of the next four weeks or so.
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Courtesy of grant's fearsome web-fu (FB crosspost):

    That one might interface nicely with that horrible story about how they used to irradiate kids' thymus glands: http://www.radiolab.org/2008/dec/29/how-to-cure-what-ails-you/
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    grant, again:

    Sweet nuclear Jesus, I finally quit all this nuclear stuff, open the
    next file on my desk and, no lie, this is the story that's there:

    Nuclear age has led to millions of fewer baby girls being born
    (Daily Mail, sorry):


    * Study claims nuclear radiation from bomb testing and power plant leaks hits female birthrate

    * Japanese nuclear disaster could hit girl births in U.S.

    Nuclear radiation from power plant leaks and bomb tests resulted in millions fewer baby girls born worldwide, according to a new study.

    Scientists noted these types of atmospheric blasts rather than on-the-ground incidents like Chernobyl, effected birth gender across the globe.

    Scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany, analysed population data from 1975 to 2007 for the U.S. and 39 European countries.
    There was an increase in the number of baby boys relative to girls in all of the countries from 1964 to
    1975.

    This was the case in many eastern European countries for several years after 1986.

    Scientists are putting the first spike down to the atomic bomb tests of the 1960s and 1970s where radioactive atoms were blasted into the atmosphere, Air currents caught these atoms and then
    distributed them around the world.

    They think the second spike is due to the 1986 Chernobyl disaster in which the reactor exploded in the Ukraine.

    The effects of Chernobyl were felt locally and no effect was seen in the U.S., probably because it was too far from the disaster to have an effect.

    'The closer the country was to Chernobyl, the stronger the effect,' said study co-author Hagen Scherb, a biostatistician at the German Research Center for Environmental Health in Munich.

    More males were born relative to females in Belarus - the Ukraine's neighbour - than in France.

    The study is based largely on Cold War-era statistics, but the findings are highly relevant for how gender could be effected after future nuclear disasters.

    And in the wake of Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident experts are
    predicting another baby boy boom could be imminent, especially on the U.S. West Coast.

    'We do not know how much radioactivity was emitted through Fukushima and how it will spread throughout the world,' Dr Scherb said.

    'Maybe it's confined to just Japan, but if it gets in the water and the air, it's possible that we could see a similar effect, especially on the West Coast of America.'


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1394553/Is-U-S-heading-baby-boy-boom-Japan-disaster-Study-finds-nuclear-radiation-results-millions-fewer-female-births-worldwide.html
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    elseware, via FB:

    There's an old scifi story from 1940; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowups_Happen
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Also in the idea-mix: modelling the reverberation of a power station cooling tower and/or field recordings from inside the tower.

    An extended group improvisation based on the hymn God of Concrete, God of Steel, which is indeed a throwback to grant mentioning it on Barbelith years ago.
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    XK's actual link, unpolluted by Facebook link-gubbins: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13763601
  • grantgrant
    Posts: 7
    Seth said:

    grant said: Did you follow my God of Concrete, God of Steel obsession a few years back? (There's an mp3 file there...)


    You were the bloke whose God of Concrete obsession inspired me! I remember the mp3, it was a guide track so people could hear the melody, right? Did you ever find a version with people singing it?


    I'm touched!
    Never did find another versions - though now there are many more tools. Hmmm. Perhaps I shall go a-looking!
  • SethSeth
    Posts: 2,431
    Let me know if you come across 'owt. Although I quite like the idea of reconstructing an approximation, too.
  • Seth said:

    elseware, via FB:

    Nuclear age has led to millions of fewer baby girls being born
    (Daily Mail, sorry):

    * Study claims nuclear radiation from bomb testing and power plant leaks hits female birthrate

    * Japanese nuclear disaster could hit girl births in U.S.


    'Maybe it's confined to just Japan, but if it gets in the water and the air, it's possible that we could see a similar effect, especially on the West Coast of America.'


    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1394553/Is-U-S-heading-baby-boy-boom-Japan-disaster-Study-finds-nuclear-radiation-results-millions-fewer-female-births-worldwide.html



    Given their poor record with science stories, it might be worth tracking that one back to the source (although they do quote it in the article, which seems a Big Step Forward).
    IEEE article is on its way to Seth.

    |Geoff

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